Sunday, October 4, 2015

Read to your child




Read to your child every day. Reading to your child is the best preparation for school readiness.  Choose books that have rich vocabulary and great illustrations. Sit and cuddle while you read, make this your special time together. Focus on your relationship, concentrate on your child for those 10 -20 minutes. 
Children you are read to daily come into school with a bigger vocabulary , better comprehension and more confidence. They are also better listeners.

Let your child see you read as well, whether it is a newspaper, magazine, or even your e reader. Help your child understand that reading opens the door to knowledge. 
Libraries are a wonderful place to take your child to choose books, the librarians can help you find great books on subjects that interest your child too. 



Farm unit, hay in sensory table

We put straw in the sensory table and had the farm animals hidden underneath. The children had a great time exploring the hay and discovering the animals. 

Saturday, October 3, 2015

Found object painting

These are wheels used for painting.  One is a single wheel with wire through it as a handle. The other one has 2 fixed roller wheels with a metal base.  The children can experiment with how they roll. 

Apple tissue paper art

The children are given a sheet of wax paper, small pieces of tissue paper and glue to create these great apple pictures.  After they are done adding tissue paper, we give them an "apple frame" that has been precut by teachers.  They place it on their picture where they want it and decide if they want the excess trimmed off or left in place.  We use the precut tissue sheets that you can buy in a box. 

Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Great smelling paint project

We added a little water to kool aid to create great smelling paint.  However, it doesn't always make paint with very vibrant colors, so we also added a little liquid water colors to make the colors more vibrant.  We used the paint during our unit on the 5 senses.  We read "nosy Rosie" by Holly Keller and "the Nose Book" by Al Perkins too.

Slant boards help develop fine motor muscles

Using a slanted upright surface helps children develop fine motor muscles to hold pencils correctly. They need to grip it more tightly to use it than if the paper is flat on a table.  Using easels with chalk, dry erase markers, crayons, or markers are all good ways to help develop these muscles.

It also helps to give them short stubby crayons so they need to grip them rather than let them lean on their hands.

Monday, September 28, 2015